The Bill and Melinda Gates’ divorce

Bill and Melinda Gates divorce

The Bill and Melinda Gates’ divorce

Our managing partner, Amanda McAlister, offers her expert opinion on the news that Bill and Melinda Gates are to divorce, and looks at some of the issues involved.

I woke this morning to the news that Bill and Melinda Gates were to get divorced. Minutes later my phone starting ringing, as I took one request after another from journalists wanting to cover the story and get my opinion on what a later-in-life divorce involves. It’s no exaggeration to say that almost every media outlet around the world is keen to look closer into why this multi-billionaire couple would want to part after 27 years of a seemingly very successful marriage.

Gates, 65, the fourth richest man in the world, founded Microsoft in 1975 and met his future wife Melinda in 1987, the year he became the world’s youngest billionaire. In 2000 they established the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. 

They have three children – Jennifer, 25, Rory, 21, and Phoebe, 18 – and in the message announcing their divorce, they wrote:

“After a great deal of thought and a lot of work, we have made the decision to end our marriage.

“Over the last 27 years, we have raised three incredible children and built a foundation that works all over the world to enable all people to lead healthy, productive lives. We continue to share a belief in that mission and will continue to work together at the foundation, but we no longer believe we can grow together as a couple in this next phase of our lives. We ask for space and privacy for our family as we begin to navigate this new life.”

Prenups and separation agreements

Court documents reveal that the couple do not have a prenuptial agreement. We’re told Melinda, 56, filed for divorce at a court in Washington state, saying “this marriage is irretrievably broken” when asked to explain the split, also revealing there was no prenuptial agreement when they wed on a Hawaiian golf course in 1994.

However, famously Bill used a pro and con list on a whiteboard to decide to whether or not to ask Melinda to marry him, so I suspect the couple may well have approached the ending of their marriage in the same carefully thought-out manner.

Indeed, the document, filed Monday in King County Superior Court in Seattle, notes that the pair has a “separation agreement.” A separation agreement is usually signed at the end of a marriage and lays out the terms of the split – it will, apparently, dictate how the couple will divide up their assets, which include the family home, a $125million compound overlooking Lake Washington on the outskirts of Seattle, a mansion in San Diego, a Santa Fe ranch, a countryside retreat in Wellington, Florida, a lakeside lodge in Wyoming which used to be home to Buffalo Bill and a garage full of Porsches, Ferraris and Lamborghinis. In fact, the Gates fortune is estimated at well over $100 billion, so I’m not surprised Melinda has not requested spousal support, according to the filing.

Divorcing after a long marriage

It’s interesting to note that there has been a significant increase in the number of couples filing for divorce who have been married for more than 20 years. I think it’s significant that the Gates’ youngest child recently turned 18: it’s reasonable to assume the couple wanted to wait for all their children to reach adulthood before they announced their formal separation, and I would also say it takes guts to do this after such a long marriage – perhaps even more so when your relationship, and your life, is so public.

How would this divorce be treated here?

Technically, separation agreements aren’t legally enforceable under UK law. But if both parties have been open and honest about their finances and taken independent legal advice about the agreement, then it’s entirely likely the court will decide you should stick to it.

However, under our jurisdiction there is also what’s known as the “millionaire defence”. This is a term created following the case of Thyssen-Bornemisza v Thyssen-Bornemisza (No) [1985] FLR 1069 where a wealthy party put forward a defence to providing full disclosure, on the basis that he had sufficient wealth to pay a lump sum or maintenance to the financially dependent party. In other words, why should the court go to the trouble, time and expense of investigating the millionaire’s means, when it is clear that he/she can meet whatever reasonable order the court is likely to make?

This defence causes some controversy as the court has an obligation to consider the parties’ financial resources properly. Furthermore, in order for the court to conclude that an order is fair and reasonable, it must consider the full and frank disclosure of all material facts, documents and other material. Nevertheless, it remains a viable option for the very wealthy, who are hopeful of keeping the precise details of their finances entirely private.

Keep it respectful

When Amazon founder Jeff Bezos and his wife MacKenzie announced their split after 25 years of marriage, they emphasised that the decision was mutual. But even when a couple part on amicable terms, the financial untangling is likely to be complex, simply because the sums involved, and the assets held, are so huge. However, neither party has said anything derogatory in public about the other, and both have moved on: MacKenzie married again two years after the divorce, her ex-husband Jeff has been with his girlfriend for two years.

I hope Bill and Melinda Gates both go forward in positivity and enjoy a fulfilling and happy future, and in particular I applaud their decision to continue to work together on their charitable foundation – showing respect for one’s ex is vital if they are to be a couple who, instead of being known for how wrong they got their divorce, are known for getting it right.

 

If you would like to consult one of our expert family lawyers about any aspect of divorce or separation, please do get in touch today. We are here to help you. 

More love and marriage…

Sarah Jessica Parker

More love and marriage…

We had such a great response to our recent Love and Marriage blog that we thought we’d add some more quotes to our special selection of celebrity words of wisdom about love, relationships and marriage.

Because there’s no doubt that on this topic everyone has their own opinion: some have their own personal deal-breakers, some know for certain the one thing that will melt their heart – and a lot of people will tell you it takes hard work and commitment.

See if you agree!

Katharine-Hepburn

“I often wonder whether men and women really suit each other. Perhaps they should live next door and just visit now and then.” Katharine Hepburn

 

Albert Einstein

“Men marry women with the hope they will never change. Women marry men with the hope they will change. Invariably, they are both disappointed.” Albert Einstein

 

Justin Timberlake and Jessica Biel

“We have a couple of rules in our relationship. The first rule is that I make her feel like she’s getting everything. The second rule is that I actually do let her have her way in everything. And, so far, it’s working.” Justin Timberlake

 

Anne Bancroft

“The best way to get most husbands to do something is to suggest that perhaps they’re too old to do it.” Anne Bancroft

 

Prince Philip and Queen Elizabeth,

“I think the main lesson we have learnt is that tolerance is the one essential ingredient in any happy marriage.” Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh

 

Rita Rudner

“I think men who have a pierced ear are better prepared for marriage. They’ve experienced pain, and bought jewellery.” Rita Rudner

 

Sarah Jessica Parker

 

“It seems so silly, but I think you’re very lucky if you like the person. I still just really like him.” Sarah Jessica Parker

How can I enforce a Children Act Order?

how can I enforce a Children Act Order?

How can I enforce a Children Act Order?

“They’re ill.”

“You were late by five minutes.”

“They don’t want to see you.”

“It isn’t on this week, you have your dates wrong.”

Above are just a handful of reasons that a parent might hear as to why a Child Arrangements Order cannot be complied with. But is this right and does this ultimately trump a court order? Associate Melissa Jones explains.

How can you enforce a Children Act Order? If you have been involved in Children Act Proceedings and obtained a final court order, there are consequences if a party breaches an order, as follows:

(a) They may be held in contempt of court and be committed to prison or fined; and/or

(b) The court may make an order requiring them to undertake unpaid work (an enforcement order) and/or an order that they pay financial compensation.

How does this really work in practice?

Essentially, the court makes the order and expects parents to ensure it works on the ground. There may be times though when a child is ill, or there is an emergency, for example , which might mean that the child arrangements cannot go ahead on occasion. However, this should not happen repeatedly and if it does then unless the other parent has “reasonable excuse” for not allowing the contact, then they would appear to be in breach of the order.

What is the enforcement court process?

There  is still an expectation that you take steps to resolve matters before applying to the court. As you may have heard before, the court is a last resort. It is best practice, before an application is made, to address the issue with the other party and inform them of the implications of not doing so.   If the matter is not resolved, then you may have little choice but to apply to the court for enforcement.

What happens when I make my application?

You can make an application to enforce the order if you feel that it has  not been complied with. At the first hearing the court can be asked to consider the facts of the alleged breach and, in some cases, if these breaches are not agreed, list a hearing to determine those facts. The court can also decide, if after listening to the reason(s) for non-compliance, if CAFCASS or Social Services need to get involved.

The court process usually follows the same process as your last case (the one where you obtained your final order), that is:

* First Hearing Dispute Resolution Appointment (FHDRA)- the purpose of the hearing is to try and agree matters as much as possible

* Review hearing- this will be listed if matters cannot be resolved at the first hearing and the non-compliance issue remains live. It might have been that a report was ordered at the FHDRA for CAFCASS or Social Services to complete, for review at this hearing

* Final hearing- where the court will make an order after listening to evidence from the parties

The bottom line in these types of cases is, that there is an order in force, and it should be adhered to. If a parent is not able to comply with an order, they are able to make an application to ‘vary’ the order to ensure that they do not indirectly continue to breach an order.

If the court finds that a party has not complied with the order it can take a number of steps as detailed above, but one of lesser known options, and quite a rarity, is to order a transfer of residence, with the child going to live with the other parent. The latter happened in the following case: Re C (A Child) [2018] EWHC 557 (Fam)

Given the implications of not adhering to an order and the court’s robust approach, it is best to get advice as early as possible.

If you are affected by any of the issues raised here, please get in touch today.  We are here to help you.

Love and marriage…

David Beckham, Victoria Beckham

Love and marriage…

As specialist family lawyers, sometimes we’re asked: “what makes a successful marriage?”

There’s no doubt that on this topic everyone has their own opinion: some have their own personal deal-breakers, some know for certain the one thing that will melt their heart – and a lot of people will tell you it takes hard work and commitment.

So we’ve gathered together a special selection of celebrity words of wisdom about love, relationships and marriage – see if you agree!

Dustin Hoffman and wife Lisa

 

“To have a successful marriage a man must, on a fundamental level, be scared of his wife.” Dustin Hoffman

 

Winston and Clementine Churchill

“My most brilliant achievement was my ability to be able to persuade my wife to marry me.” Winston Churchill

 

George Clooney and Amal Clooney

“I have someone who I can talk to about anything, and someone who I care more about than I’ve cared about anything. It’s nice.” George Clooney

 

Michael Douglas and Catherine Zeta-Jones

“For marriage to be a success, every woman and every man should have their own bathroom.” Catherine Zeta-Jones

 

John Legend and Chrissy Teigen

“I always have a note in my pocket that reads ‘John did it’ – just in case I’m murdered, because I don’t want him to remarry.” Chrissy Teigen

 

David Beckham, Victoria Beckham

“Do you go through tough times? Of course. That’s part of relationships. It’s part of marriages. It’s part of having children. It’s part of having responsibilities.” David Beckham

 

 

“Marriage is a wonderful invention: then again, so is the bicycle repair kit.” Billy Connolly

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